Economic & Social Development of Regions

All courses, arranged by program, are listed in the catalog. Courses designated as “active” have been offered in the past three years. Courses designated as “inactive” have not been offered in the past three years and indicate the semester in which the course was last offered. If you cannot locate a specific course, try our advanced search link. Current class schedules, with posted days and times, may be found on the Registrar's Office website or by logging directly into iSiS.

57.201 Regions: Merrimack Valley Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 6132
Status Active

The ways people produce, distribute, and consume the world's resources profoundly influence the problems we experience in this and other regions of the world. Problems occur most particularly in the areas of work, community, and environment. The goal of this interdisciplinary course is to explore such regional problems and possible solutions within national and global contexts, as well as historical. In the area of work, we will discuss what is necessary to create good jobs, characterized by decent pay and benefits, worker involvement in decision making, and healthy workplaces free from discrimination. In the area of community, we will address such things as patterns of immigration and the interactions between community stability and institutions such as education, family, political leadership, and religion. In the area of environment, we will explore issues surrounding the reduction of pollution that infects our communities and living spaces (e.g., the tradeoff between environmental improvement and economic growth). The course will stress experiential learning (via field trips and small group activities) and will include films as well as readings and presentations from various disciplines. (General Education Course (BS))

57.211 Sustainable Development Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 6134
Status Active

This course examines workplace and regional factors that shape the prospects for sustainable prosperity and worker and community empowerment. The course begins by reviewing recent trends in the distribution of income and wealth and the industrial structure of the New England economy. The historical dynamics shaping work organization and regional development are examined. Several industry case studies are selected because of their importance to the regional and national economy. The case studies provide focus for studying the strategic choices made by firms in mature industries and newly emerging regions; the basis of competitive advantage for Japanese firms and the response of American rivals; and the influence of the product cycle and regional institutions on capture or retention of emerging and mature industries. The final section of the course focuses on the prospects for sustainability of the organization of production and its environmental impact, incentives for skill development and technological innovation, and shared prosperity. A central course objective is to foster an understanding of the links between the workplace and region in the pursuit of sustainable development and shared prosperity.

57.220 Designing the Future World Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 33440
Status Active

All purposeful human activity involves design. Every day we are surrounded by the products of design processes--buildings, cars, entertainment, corporations, schools, even laws and regulations. They make our lives easier in many ways, but they may also create significant social and environmental problems. In the past, designers often did not consider the impact of their deigns on society, or ignored the negative consequences. Our culture and legal system usually permitted, or even encouraged, this irresponsibility. Today, a small group of scholars, businessmen and women, and activists are rethinking how we design the things around us, with the goal of addressing the most pressing social and environmental issues. This class will introduce students to some of these issues, the people who are confronting them, and the ways in which all of us can contribute to designing a better Future World. With a series of hands on projects, coupled with readings and other resources, students will work to design aspects of the future. In the process you will learn about possible solutions to complex, important problems, but also learn valuable life skills such as problem framing, problem solving, critical thinking, active learning, communication, and simple construction methods. No previous experience is required-only curiosity and eagerness to learn.

57.408 The Budget as a Policy, Planning and Information Tool Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 33622
Status Active

In simple terms, an organization�s budget is its financial plan of operations based on expected income and anticipated expenses for a given period. The budget involves the priority ranking of desired ends and the selection of means to reach those ends in an environment of competing demands and limited resources. Budgeting is an ongoing process of gathering information, applying that information to the allocation of scarce resources as well as to the evaluation of the achievement of desired ends. The budget is also a policy document used to both communicate organizational goals and to promote their realization. This course will examine the various forms financial plans can take in local government entities and not-for-profit organizations. It will focus on the budget as a policy, planning and information tool for managing practitioners. It will begin with an overview of the legal, procedural and practical framework of budgeting in the public and nongovernmental organization (NGO) sectors, examine closely the applications of the various stages of the budget process, delve into modern strategic program management and conclude with case studies of both a municipal jurisdiction and a regional community action agency..

57.420 Gender, Work and Public Policy Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 33616
Status Active

This seminar course, "Gender, Work and Public Policy" will explore the relationship between human rights, gender and work issues in the 21st century. We will examine how current and future reality can be shaped by related public policies. Today we live in a period of global transition comparable to the period that followed the Industrial Revolution. It presents us with enormous challenges and opportunities regarding factors we will address in class: economic globalization, government restructuring, work-family balancing, environmental safety at work, gender inequalities and the connection between human rights and dignity at work. We will especially look at public policies that can either impede or advance better overall equality of work-life and family life.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: Senior Status.

57.475 Community Conflict Resolution Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 6173
Status Active

This course gives students an understanding of the main issues and solutions involved in community level conflict resolution; e.g., in neighborhoods, workplaces, and other institutions. It develops students' skills in practicing conflict resolution and/or evaluating programs in the field of dispute resolution.It is important to understand why conflict happens and how to resolve conflict.

57.491 Directed Studies: Regional Economic and Social Development Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 6174
Status Active

Directed Studies: Regional Economic and Social Development

57.496 Practicum In Regional Economic and Social Development Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 6179
Status Active

Practicum In Regional Economic and Social Development