Chemistry

Doctoral Programs in Chemistry

Doctor of Philosopy (Ph.D.) in Chemistry

Specializations:

  • Analytical
  • Inorganic
  • Organic
  • Physical

Options:

Specializations

Analytical, Inorganic, Organic and Physical Chemistry

The doctoral program in chemistry is designed to provide the students with a background in advanced course work and chemical laboratory techniques that will prepare them to carry out, under the guidance of experienced scientists, an original, independent investigation that will lead to an acceptable contribution to the body of contemporary knowledge.

Plan of Program

The doctoral degree normally requires four years of study beyond the bachelor's degree or a minimum of two to three years beyond the master's degree. The plan of study pursued by each student is dependent on individual requirements and is developed through a conference with the Advisory Committee (or with his or her temporary advisor). The initial part of the student's program, normally completed at the end of two years of study, is devoted to formal course work. The first year is usually given to subjects in the major branches of chemistry in preparation for area (candidacy) examinations. The second year is devoted primarily to advanced subjects in a special field of concentration. The second and final part of the program is devoted principally to research leading to the doctoral thesis. However, the student is encouraged to begin research as early as possible in the program of study.

Research Tools Requirements

These research tools may be a second foreign language, a computer language, a statistics course or another skill acceptable to both the Graduate Coordinator and the research advisor of the student. The language(s) selected may not include the native language of a student's country of origin. Students in all Ph.D. programs may fulfill this requirement by 1) two foreign language courses; 2) one foreign language and a research skill course or 3) two research skill courses. Language Requirement may be met by completion of a two-semester undergraduate course sequence in French, German, Japanese or Russian with an average grade of B or better satisfies this requirement. Research skill requirement may be met by taking courses in programming and/or Statistics.

Credit Requirements

Of the 45 minimum credit requirements, a minimum of 27 credits in course work, exclusive of thesis and seminar, is required with at least 18 to be taken in chemistry. The remaining course credits (9 or more, with a student's Advisory Committee having the authority to add 6 additional credits to the minimum in special situations) may be taken in chemistry or in a related field such as biology, physics, mathematics or engineering. Credit is not normally allowed for undergraduate subjects in chemistry except for those so designated in the catalog. Research credits and seminars would then make up the remainder of the 45 credit requirements. Planning the program of courses with the student is the responsibility of a student's Advisory Committee.

Course Requirements

Each student in any of the Ph.D. programs in Chemistry shall take both an advanced course in Physical Chemistry and Organic Chemistry and two courses from Advanced Inorganic, Advanced Analytical, Biochemistry, or Polymer Chemistry unless such requirements have been met previously. Since each division (Analytical, Biochemistry, Organic and Physical/Inorganic) has its own specific course requirements, a student intending to specialize in one of these areas is encouraged to meet with the coordinator of that program.

A. Course Requirements (Ph.D.): Analytical Chemistry Specialization

27 Credits in course work are required. They are:

84.514 Advanced Analytical Chemistry

[84.523 Organic Reaction Mechanisms or

84.568 Structural Analysis]

84.532 Advanced Physical Chemistry

84.538 Biochemical Mechanisms

84.543 Modern Inorganic Chemistry

84.550 Biochemistry I

84.580 Advanced Analytical Biochemistry

Note: With the exception of 84.514, Advanced Analytical Chemistry, one of the following courses may be substituted but only with the permission of the student's faculty advisor and the analytical coordinator. Of the remaining 15 credits at least 6 must be in chemistry. The approval of the advisor and analytical coordinator are required for non-chemistry courses. Such courses must be justified as being relevant to the student's course of study.

B. Course Requirements (Ph.D.): Inorganic Chemistry Specialization

Required Courses:

84.532 Advanced Physical Chemistry

84.543 Modern Inorganic Chemistry

84.534 Quantum Chemistry

84.540 Chemical Kinetics

84.523 Organic Reaction Mechanisms

One course to be selected from:

84.514 Advanced Analytical Chemistry

84.550 Biochemistry I

84.551 Biochemistry II

84.580 Advanced Analytical Biochemistry

The remaining 9 credits may be taken in chemistry, mathematics or engineering.

C. Course Requirement (Ph.D.): Organic Chemistry Specialization

Required Courses:

84.523 Organic Reaction Mechanisms

84.524 Organic Synthesis

84.532 Advanced Physical Chemistry

84.568 Structural Analysis

And two courses selected from the following:

84.514 Advanced Analytical Chemistry

84.534 Quantum Chemistry

84.538 Biochemical Mechanisms

84.543 Modern Inorganic Chemistry

84.550 Biochemistry I

The remaining course requirements may be fulfilled by selecting courses from the following list or from graduate courses offered by other departments.

84.527 Stereochemistry

84.563 Chemistry of Natural Products

84.565 Heterocyclic Chemistry

D. Course Requirements (Ph.D.): Physical Chemistry Specialization

Required courses:

84.532 Advanced Physical Chemistry

84.523 Organic Reaction Mechanisms

84.543 Modern Inorganic Chemistry

and a choice from the following:

84.513 Spectroscopy

84.514 Advanced Analytical Chemistry

97.503 Advanced Polymer Science I

Written Area Examinations

Upon admission to the Ph.D. program the student must pass exams in his/her major area of specialization. The method of conducting these area exams is designated by the staff in each field of specialization, as follows:

Analytical Chemistry

The area examinations for analytical chemistry will consist of a series of six (6) examinations. The first will be a qualifying examination used to test the student’s general knowledge of Analytical Chemistry. The student will have two opportunities to pass the qualifying examination with a score of 5.0 out of 10.0 points This qualifying exam will be administered at the beginning and end of the area exams. The area examinations will be offered annually, commencing in October and administered at monthly intervals. A minimum of 6.0 out of a possible 10.0 points is required for each individual examination and a total of at least 30.0 out of a possible 50.0 points is required for the successful completion of the Written Area Examination. Failure to perform adequately may resulting the student being required to complete a master's degree. Continuation towards the Ph.D. degree will be considered on a Case-by-case basis.

Inorganic Chemistry

The area examinations in Inorganic Chemistry will be a series of cumulative examinations. The student is expected to begin the series of exams in the second year of study. The area examinations will consist of a series of five (5) examinations. The examinations are each graded from 0.0 to a maximum of 3.0 points. A student must receive a total of 8.0 points to successfully complete the area examinations. Students who do not receive the necessary points may complete a master's degree and with special permission apply for readmission to the Ph.D. program in Inorganic Chemistry.

Organic Chemistry

Organic students take a series of eight cumulative examinations, given once a month (except December), beginning in September of each year. The examinations are graded pass or fail and a student must pass four of the examinations. The examinations must be taken in consecutive months. Typically, a student will start the examinations in the second year of graduate study and must complete these examinations by the end of the third year of graduate study.

Physical Chemistry

By the third year of graduate study, a Ph.D. student in physical chemistry must take a comprehensive examination. This is an all day written examination with questions designed to test the student's physical chemistry background, and ability to set up models and solve them mathematically. The student has two chances to pass the comprehensive examination.

Research Proposal

As part of the area examination(s) a Ph.D. candidate must present an oral defense of an original research proposal within 3 months of completing the written area examinations although a specific program may require the proposal to be presented at an earlier date. With the aid and advice of the Advisory Committee the student selects a suitable subject for investigation, completes a literature survey, outlines the method of approach, and suggests possible results and conclusions. The oral defense of this proposal is conducted by the student's Advisory Committee with other faculty members in attendance. The proposal is defended by the end of the semester following completion of area exams. The topic of the proposal cannot be closely related to or contained within the thesis project.

Chemistry Seminar

During each year of residence the student is required to attend and participate in 84-601,602, Chemistry Seminar, and 84-603,604, Chemistry Colloquium. Each doctoral student is required to present two seminars.

Candidacy for the Doctorate in Chemistry

To be admitted to candidacy for the doctorate, a student must:

  1. Satisfy the 27 course credit requirement, with a minimum Grade Point Average of 3.0.
  2. Pass the area examinations, which includes completion of a research proposal.
  3. Fulfill the research tools requirements.
  4. Inform the graduate coordinator in writing that the above requirements have been completed.

Ph.D. Option in Biochemistry

The Departments of Chemistry, Biological Sciences, Computer Science, and Health and Clinical Sciences have developed a program in biochemistry that results in the awarding of a Ph.D. in Chemistry. This program draws upon the special and diverse talents of these faculties, and provides chemistry graduate students with both in-breadth class work and in-depth thesis research. Emphasis is on the application of modern techniques and concepts of physical and chemical science to the solution of problems of current interest in biology and medicine.

Students may choose one of four concentrations in the Biochemistry Option:

  1. Biochemistry
  2. Cellular and Molecular Biology
  3. Clinical/Nutritional Biochemistry
  4. Biocheminformatics

Dissertation research can be conducted in any of the aforementioned departments or in an interdisciplinary setting.

Admission Requirements and Removal of Undergraduate Deficiencies

Admission to the program requires demonstration of an acceptable B.S., B.A., or M.S. degree in chemistry, biology, biochemistry or other related science. Students will be expected to have completed two semesters each of general, organic and physical chemistry as well as introductory biology. Deficiencies must be removed by enrolling in the corresponding undergraduate course during the first year in the program.

Academic Standards for Retention in the Biochemistry Program

The graduate student is expected to maintain an average of 3.0 or better in all his/her graduate-level courses. All other department requirements must also be met.

Research Tools Requirement

These requirements have been described above.

Degree Requirements

There are 45 credits required for the Ph.D. in Chemistry, Biochemistry Option. A total of 27 of these must be in formal courses while the remaining 18 will be accrued in Doctoral Dissertation. Of the 27 required hours of graduate course work, the Biochemistry Program requires that 15 hours are in the specific courses delineated below:

84.550 Biochemistry I

84.551 Biochemistry II

84.538 Biochemical Mechanisms

84.560 Advanced Physical Biochemistry

84.580 Advanced Analytical Biochemistry

The remaining elective courses (a minimum of 12 hours) may be selected from approved graduate courses in the Biology Sciences, Chemistry, Health & Clinical Sciences, or Chemical Engineering Departments. Course selection should be made in consultation with the student’s research advisor. Below is a list of possible elective courses.

84.514 Advanced Analytical Chemistry

84.526 Chromatography

84.543 Modern Inorganic Chemistry

84.563 Chemistry of Natural Products

84.567 Advanced Computational Chemistry

84.569 Advanced Biocheminformatics

84.570 Advanced Protein Chemistry

10/81.535 Principles of Cell and Microbe Cultivation

10/81.545 Isolation and Purification of Biotech Products

81.567/569 Recombinant DNA Techniques

81.576/578 Cell Culture

81.593 Immunology

36.506 Biochemistry of Lipids

36.552 Advanced Clinical Biochemistry Seminars

During each semester in residence all full-time students must register for a seminar course and attend one seminar each week, as required by the Chemistry Department. The student is required to present two one-hour presentations during his/her residence.

Research

A. Initiation of Research – Preceptor Selection Procedure

The dissertation research of each graduate student may be initiated at any time but not later than the end of the second semester in the program. The student is advised to make serious efforts, prior to the summer following his/her first entrance to the program, to initiate faculty research interviews and attempt to identify the area of his/her research interest and particular research group which may be suitable for pursuing his/her research goals.

B. Examination Committee

The examination committee will be composed of four faculty members chosen after consultation by the student with his/her preceptor. Two of these members must be from the Department of Chemistry faculty.

Examinations

A. Comprehensive Exam

Please contact the biochemistry program coordinator concerning details about the area examination.

B. Oral Research Proposal must be presented within 3 months of completion of comprehensive exam. Failure to do so will result in the student being required to complete a master's degree before reentering the Doctoral Program. The student will be required to present and defend, orally, a research proposal in an area of biochemistry related to but not identical to that of his/her the-sis. A written copy of the proposed research must be distributed to the Examination Committee at least one week prior to the examination. All members of the university community are welcome to attend these examinations. Failure to perform adequately in either the written proposal or the oral defense may result in the student being required to complete an M.S. degree. Continuation toward a Ph.D. degree will be judged on a case by case basis.

Admission to Candidacy for the Doctorate

To be admitted to candidacy for the doctorate, a student must:

  1. Complete all required courses with necessary grade point average. There is an absolute minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) requirement of 3.0 for all graduate work. At the end of the first semester, if a student is found to be below the minimum GPA, a written warning will be issued. If the cumulative GPA is not raised to 3.0 or higher by the end of the second semester in residence, the student will automatically be dropped from the Ph.D. program but allowed to continue toward a master's degree in Biochemistry with the approval of the graduate committee. While completing the M.S., a candidate must have a minimum GPA of 3.0 and maintain that GPA throughout the remainder of his or her career. Upon successful completion of the Master of Science degree, the student may reapply for admission to the doctoral program. Each case will be reviewed on an individual basis. Students reentering the Ph.D. program will then satisfy all the requirements for the degree including passing the comprehensive examination, presentation of their research proposal, and completion of their research and dissertation defense. Seminar presentations and course work accomplished to complete the master's degree will, of course, be cumulative.
  2. Pass the area exams.
  3. Fulfill the research tools requirement.
  4. Successfully present and defend the Oral Research Proposal by the end of the fourth semester of full time study.
  5. Present two seminars.
  6. Secure written approval of his/her research preceptor and the chemistry graduate coordinator. When these requirements have been fulfilled, the Biochemistry Graduate Committee will recommend that the graduate coordinator of the Department of Chemistry notify the Registrar's Office to place the student on the list of candidates for the Ph.D. degree. Admission to candidacy in no way guarantees the granting of the degree.

Ph.D. Option in Environmental Studies

This graduate program is designed as an optional course of study to the traditional Ph.D. in Chemistry for students with backgrounds in engineering (civil, environmental and chemical engineering) and other sciences (physics, biology, etc.) as well as chemistry. Candidates will be exposed to advanced course work in chemistry and environmental engineering and will be able to choose an area of specialization that best suits their interests and previous experience. A combination of faculty from Chemistry, Work Environment and Civil Engineering with a variety of research expertise gives this program unique characteristics and affords the student the opportunity to per-form practical interdisciplinary research. It is expected that most students will require at least four years beyond the Bachelor's degree and two years past the Master's degree.

Entrance Requirements

In addition to the requirements for admission listed in this catalog, applicant will have an earned bachelor's degree in one of the following fields: chemistry, chemical or civil engineering, biology, environmental sciences, geology or physics. Students will be expected to have satisfactorily completed undergraduate courses in analytical, organic, and physical chemistry, physics and calculus. However, applicants who have not completed courses in these areas of chemistry may remedy their deficiencies while in the program and, therefore, are encouraged to apply. Admissions will be determined by a committee consisting of faculty active in the program.

Program Outline

A total of 48 credits are required for the Ph.D. program. Of these, at least 30 credits must be in course work exclusive of seminar and the rest is usually in thesis research. Courses shown below are divided into three categories:

  • core course requirements (9 credits),
  • areas of specialization (12 credits), and
  • elective courses (9 credits).

Additional elective courses from other departments may be substituted with the approval of the student's Advisory Committee.

In addition, full-time students must register for 84.601/84.602 or 18.502 Environmental/Analytical seminar every semester.

Each student will be required to give two seminars on current research topics during their graduate career. Students in the Environmental program must select a thesis advisor by the end of the second semester. At this time, an Advisory Committee is appointed and a plan of study is established. The Advisory Committee must consist of at least four members, including the thesis advisor. A minimum of two Chemistry Department faculty is required to be on the committee with two other members from any participating department. An additional member from another department may also be added if agreed upon by the student and thesis advisor. Students must maintain a 3.0 cumulative average in order to continue in the program.

Required Courses (21 credits):

I. Core Courses (9 credits)

84.514 Advanced Analytical Chemistry
84.532 Advanced Physical Chemistry
[84.523 Organic Reaction Mechanism or
84.568 Structural Analysis]

II. Areas of Specialization (12 credits)

a. Analytical /Environment

14.567 Environmental Chemistry I (Aquatic Chemistry)
14.568 Environmental Chemistry II (Fate and Transport)
84.519 Environmental Chemistry III (Marine Chemistry)
84.526 Chromatography

b. Water Environment

14.567 Environmental Chemistry I (Aquatic Chemistry)
14.568 Environmental Chemistry II (Fate and Transport)
84.519 Environmental Chemistry III (Marine Chemistry)
14.562 Groundwater Hydrology

c. Air Environment

18.571 Air Pollution Phenomenology
18.523 Air Resources Management & Control
18.573 Air Pollution Laboratory (Monitoring and analysis)
14.568 Environmental Chemistry II (Fate and Transport)

III. Elective Courses (9 credits)

84.532 Advanced Physical Chemistry

84.523 Organic Reaction Mechanisms

84.568 Structural Analysis

14.567 Environmental Chemistry I (Aquatic Chemistry)

14.568 Environmental Chemistry II (Fate and Transport)

84.519 Environmental Chemistry III (Marine Chemistry)

84.526 Chromatography

84.586 Spectrochemical Analysis

14.562 Groundwater Hydrology

14.561 Physical Chemical Treatment Processes

18.568 Environmental Laboratory

18.571 Air Pollution Phenomenology

18.523 Air Resources Management

18.573 Air Pollution Laboratory (Monitoring and Analysis)

93.415 Advanced Atmospheric Dynamics I

93.416 Advanced Atmospheric Dynamics II

93.430 Atmospheric Diffusion

18.572 Energy and the Environment

92.591 Statistical Modeling and Data Analysis

14.565 Industrial Waste Water Treatment Processes

18.510 Water Resources Management

18.522 Solid Waste Management (Municipal, Industrial and Hazardous)

18.525 Epidemiology for Environmental Studies

18.527 Environmental Law

19.501 Industrial Hygiene

98.501 Radiation Safety and Control

98.503 Radiation Biology

98.508 Environmental Toxicology

Written Area Examinations (Cumulative Examinations)

Beginning in the second year of study, the student must pass examinations in their major area of specialization. The faculty administers examinations associated with the program and are based on course work either completed or in progress as well as seminars, scientific literature and accepted theory in the field of study. Environmental studies students take six cumulative examinations each of which focuses on a different area of environmental science and analytical chemistry. Students must take the examinations consecutively in a given academic year. The topic, date, time and faculty member in charge of a particular exam in the cumulative examination series will be given to the student prior to the first cumulative exam. Students taking cumulative exams are urged to meet with the individual faculty member preparing an exam for more specific information. If a student misses a cumulative exam a grade of zero will be assigned. There are no makeup cumulative exams.

Research Proposal

A Ph.D. candidate must submit an original research proposal and successfully pass an oral defense of that proposal in their second or third year of study. After consulting with their Advisory Committee, the student selects a suitable subject for investigation, completes a literature survey, outlines the method of approach, and suggests possible results and conclusions. The oral defense of this proposal is con-ducted by the student's Advisory Committee with other faculty in attendance. The proposal must be defended within three months following completion of the cumulative examinations.

Ph.D. Option in Green Chemistry

The doctoral program in chemistry is designed to provide the students with a background in advanced course work and chemical laboratory techniques that will prepare them to carry out, under the guidance of experienced scientists, an original, independent investigation that will lead to an acceptable contribution to the body of contemporary knowledge. The requirements of this Program exactly parallel the requirements of the Ph.D. Organic Chemistry Specialization with the exception that an additional 9 credits of course work are required above the 27 credit minimum required for the Organic Ph.D. Furthermore, the requirements of this program closely parallel those of the other highly successful doctoral programs in chemistry at UMass Lowell.

Plan of Program

The doctoral degree normally requires four years of study beyond the bachelor's degree or a minimum of two to three years beyond the master's degree. The plan of study pursued by each student is dependent on individual requirements and is developed through a conference with the Advisory Committee (or with his or her temporary advisor). The initial part of the student's program, normally completed by the end of two years of study, is devoted to formal course work. The first year is usually given to subjects in the major branches of chemistry in preparation for area (candidacy) examinations. The second year is devoted primarily to advanced subjects in a special field of concentration. The second and final part of the program is devoted principally to research leading to the doctoral thesis. However, the student is encouraged to begin research as early as possible in the program of study.

Credit Requirements

Of the 54 minimum credit requirements, a minimum of 36 credits in course work, exclusive of thesis and seminar, is required with at least 21 graduate credits to be taken in chemistry listed in the two sections that follow. Credit is not normally allowed for undergraduate subjects in chemistry except for those so designated in the catalog. Research credits and seminars would then make up the remainder of the 54 credit requirement. Planning the program of courses with the student is the responsibility of a student's Research Advisor and/or Advisory Committee.

Course Requirements:

84.523 Organic Reaction Mechanisms
84.524 Organic Synthesis
84.532 Advanced Physical Chemistry
84.568 Organic Structural Analysis

2. Required are three elective courses selected from the following courses having an 84-or 97- prefix:

84.514 Advanced Analytical Chemistry
84.538 Biochemical Mechanisms
84.543 Modern Inorganic Chemistry
84.550 Biochemistry I
97.503,504 Advanced Polymer Science I, II
84.563 Chemistry of Natural Products
84.526 Chromatography
84.672 Surface and Colloid Chemistry

3. Required are two additional courses:

At least one additional course having an 84- or 97- prefix OR a course from a closely related discipline.

4. In order to pursue the Green Chemistry Option, three additional courses taken above the 27 credit minimum defined above are needed to satisfy this Concentration. These courses require the approval of the Organic Chemistry/Green Chemistry Committee (Drs. Sandman, Chiang, Manohar). Pre-approved courses include:

19.503 Toxicology and Health
19.550 Environmental Law and Policy
10.529 Experimental Conceptualization

Cumulative Examinations

Students in the Green Chemistry Option must pass four cumulative examinations to be taken at the beginning of the second full year of study. The exams will be given eight times in the Fall semester at two week intervals, and four must be passed to satisfy this requirement. The exams will be based on the required courses, seminars, and knowledge of the current literature from state-of-the-art journals such as Journal of the American Chemical Society, Journal of Organic Chemistry, Chemical Communications, Angewandte Chemie International Edition, Organic Letters, Accounts of Chemical Research, and Chemical Reviews.

Each cumulative examination will consist of announced and unannounced topics at the discretion of the examiner. The exam will be three hours in duration. The examining faculty will include the Organic Chemistry/Green Chemistry Committee. Topics to be covered on the examinations will be determined by the Committee. A faculty member from the Department of Chemistry at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth may also be included, as appropriate in a given year when student(s) in the joint doctoral program with UMass Dartmouth are taking cumulative exams. The grading of each exam will be “pass” or “fail”.

Original Research Proposal

Upon completion of the cumulative examination requirement, a student must defend an original research proposal within 3 months. The topic of the proposal should be different from the research topic of the student. The defense will be public and the examining committee must have a minimum of two voting chemistry faculty members. There should be a thesis advising committee consisting of at least 4 UMass Lowell faculty members with a minimum of two voting chemistry faculty members. The rest of the committee members may include a co-advisor and non-chemistry faculty as voting members. The subject of the proposal requires approval of the Committee prior to presentation; unanimous decision of the Committee is required for the student to successfully satisfy this requirement.

Seminars

A student must present at least two seminars in the course of a Ph.D. program.

Selection of Advisor

By the end of the first academic year of graduate study, the student must select a research advisor in the Chemistry Department. A non-chemistry faculty member may be a co-advisor, but in such a case, the co-advisor is responsible for the support of the student.

Ph.D. Option in Polymer Science and Polymer/Plastics Engineering

Students in the Ph.D. Program in the Department of Chemistry may elect the Polymer Science or the Polymer Science/Plastics Engineering Option. The Polymer Science/Plastics Engineering Option doctoral program is organized jointly with the Department of Plastics Engineering. The program is designed to provide students with a background in advanced course work and laboratory techniques that will prepare them to carry out an original investigation leading to an acceptable contribution to the body of contemporary knowledge in the fields of macromolecules or plastics.

Plan of Program

The doctoral degree normally requires four years of full-time study beyond the bachelor's degree or a minimum of two to three years of full-time study beyond the master's degree. The plan of study pursued by each student is dependent on individual requirements and is developed through conference with his/her Advisory Committee (or temporary advisor).

All students entering the program must take the American Chemical Society Graduate Level placement examinations in organic, physical and analytical chemistry. An evaluation examination in polymer science is given to those who wish to be exempted from 97-503-504.

Requirements for Admission

Requirements for admission into the program are the same as those for students entering other Ph.D. programs in Chemistry. It is the student's responsibility to satisfy any admission requirements stipulated for the Ph.D. in Chemistry.

Undergraduate deficiencies in the student's background must be remedied promptly, usually by the end of the student's second semester. During this period, the student must also successfully complete graduate courses appropriate to his/her background. Students will not be formally admitted to the Ph.D. program if their grade point average is below B.

Advisory Committee

Upon admission the student will be assigned a temporary adviser by the Coordinator of the Graduate Polymer Program. The student's major thesis adviser will become the chairperson of the permanent Advisory Committee.

The Advisory Committee will meet at least once each semester to monitor the progress of the student's research.

Program Outline

The initial part of the program is devoted to formal course work. The first year usually is devoted to subjects in major branches of chemistry, polymers, and plastics in preparation for the student's area (cumulative) examinations. The student must choose a research adviser before the end of the second semester and is normally expected to start research during the first summer.

Language Requirements

Pathways for satisfying the language requirements have been described previously under the Chemistry section of this catalog.

Written Area Examinations

Upon formal admission to the Ph.D. program the student is required to pass a series of consecutive cumulative area examinations. This requirement must be completed by the end of the third semester for students entering in the fall semester, and by the end of the fourth semester for students entering in the spring semester. Policy and grading underlying each examination will be announced at the beginning of each academic year.

Each student must also present an oral defense of an original research proposal within six months after the completion of the last area exam.

Course Requirements

Of the 45 minimum credit requirements a minimum of 27 credits in course work, exclusive of thesis and seminar, is required with at least 18 to be taken in chemistry and polymer science (84 and 97 prefixes). The remaining course credits (nine or more, with a student's Advisory Committee having the authority to add six additional credits to the minimum in special situations) may be taken in chemistry or in a related field such as biology, physics, mathematics or engineering. Credit normally is not allowed for undergraduate subjects in chemistry except for those so designated in the catalog. Research credits would then make up the remainder of the 45 credit requirement. The program of courses is the responsibility of a student's Advisory Committee and must include advanced subjects in the appropriate areas of chemistry, polymers, and plastics. When it is necessary to carry less than the normal credit load of 9 per semester, the student must apply to the chairman of the department through the chairman of his/her Advisory Committee for approval.

Required Courses: The student must take the following core courses:

a. Polymer Science:

84.523 Organic Reaction Mechanisms

84.568 Structural Analysis

84.532 Advanced Physical Chemistry

97.503 Advanced Polymer Science I

97.504 Advanced Polymer Science II

97.553 Organic Chemistry of Macromolecules

97.505 Polymer Preparation & Characterization

The following course schedule is suggested to prepare the students for the cumulative examinations:

First Semester

97.503 Advanced Polymer Science 1 3 cr
84.568 Structural Analysis 3 cr
26.503 Mechanical Behavior of Polymers 3 cr

Second Semester

97.504 Advanced Polymer Science II 3 cr
97.553 Organic Chemistry of Macromolecules 3 cr
84.532 Advanced Physical Chemistry 3 cr

Third Semester


97.505Polymer Preparation and Characterization2 cr

Cumulative Examinations

The remaining required courses may be taken in the following semesters.

In addition, the student must register for Polymer Seminar 97.601/602 and 97.603/604 Polymer Science Colloquium each semester.

b. Polymer Science/Plastics Engineering Option:

84.523 Organic Reaction Mechanisms

84.568 Structural Analysis

84.532 Advanced Physical Chemistry

97.503 Advanced Polymer Science I

97.504 Advanced Polymer Science II

97.553 Organic Chemistry of Macromolecules

97.505 Polymer Preparation & Characterization

26.503 Mechanical Behavior of Polymers

26.506 Polymer Structure

26.509 Plastics Processing I

26.510 Plastics Processing II

The following course schedule is suggested to prepare the students electing the Polymer Science/Plastics Engineering option for the cumulative examinations:

First Semester

97.503 Advanced Polymer Science 1 3 cr
26.509 Plastics Processing I 3 cr
26.503 Mechanical Behavior of Polymers 3 cr

Second Semester

97.504 Advanced Polymer Science II 3 cr
97.553 Organic Chemistry of Macromolecules 3 cr
26.510 Plastics Processing II 3 cr

Third Semester

97.505 Polymer Preparation and Characterization 2 cr

Cumulative Examinations

The remaining required courses may be taken in the following semesters.

In addition, the student must register for Polymer Seminar 97.601/602 and 97.603/604 Polymer Science Colloquium each semester.

Candidacy for Ph.D. Polymer Science, and Polymer Science/Plastics Engineering Option

To be admitted for candidacy for the doctorate, a student must:

1. Satisfy the course credit requirement with a minimum grade point average of 3.0.

2. Pass the area examinations which includes completion of the research proposal.

3. Fulfill the language requirements.

4. Secure the approval of his/her Advisory Committee and the Graduate Coordinator of the Department of Chemistry.

When these requirements have been fulfilled, the Graduate Coordinator of the Department of Chemistry notifies the Registrar's Office in writing and recommends that the student be placed on the list of candidates for Ph.D. degree. Admission to candidacy in no way guarantees the granting of the degree.