Jordan Camp

Jordan T. Camp, Sociology

Jordan T. Camp, Sociology

Assistant Professor
Phone:
978-934-4917
Office:
Dugan Hall 205H

Research Interest

Racial and Class Formation, Popular and Political Culture, Mass Incarceration, Political Economy and Social Theory, Social Movements, Space and Place, Urban Studies

Educational Background

Ph.D., Department of Sociology, University of California, Santa Barbara

Biosketch

During 2014-2015, Jordan T. Camp will be on leave while serving as a Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Center for African American Studies at Princeton University. His research focuses on racial and class formation, expressive culture, political economy, social theory, social movements, and U.S. political culture. He is currently completing his first book, Incarcerating the Crisis: Race, Security, Prisons, and the Second Reconstruction (under contract, University of California Press), co-editing and completing (with Laura Pulido) Clyde A. Woods’ Development Drowned and Reborn: The Blues and Bourbon Restorations in Post-Katrina New Orleans (under review, University of Georgia Press), and co-editing (with Christina Heatherton) Policing the Planet (under contract, Verso Books).  His work appears or is forthcoming in venues such as American Quarterly, Kalfou, Race & Class, In the Wake of Hurricane Katrina, edited by Clyde Woods (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2010), and Race, Empire, and the Crisis of the Subprime, edited by Paula Chakravartty and Denise da Silva (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013). He earned his Ph.D. at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Publications:

Incarcerating the Crisis: Race, Security, Prisons, and the Second Reconstruction (under contract, University of California Press).

“Challenging the Terms of Order: Representations of the Detroit Rebellions, 1967-1968,” Kalfou 1.2 (forthcoming).

“Black Radicalism, Marxism, and Collective Memory: An Interview with Robin D. G. Kelley,” American Quarterly 65.1 (2013): 215-230. 

“Blues Geographies and the Security Turn: Interpreting the Housing Crisis in Los Angeles,” Special Issue of American Quarterly: Race, Empire, and Crisis of Subprime 64.3 (2012): 543-570. 

    Reprinted in Race, Empire, and the Crisis of the ‘Subprime,’ eds. Paula Chakravartty and Denise Ferreira da Silva (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013).

Review of David Roediger, ed., Listening to Revolt: The Selected Writings of George P. Rawick. Race & Class 53.4 (2012): 95-98.

Freedom Now! Struggles for the Human Right to Housing in Los Angeles and Beyond, coedited with Christina Heatherton (Los Angeles: Freedom Now Books, 2012). Reviewed in journal City (Fall 2013). 

Review of Muhammad Ahmad, We Will Return in the Whirlwind: Black Radical Organizations, 1960-1975 and Yohuru Williams and Jama Lazerow Liberated Territory: Untold Perspectives on the Black Panther Party. Race and Class 51.3 (January 2010): 90-98.

“‘We Know This Place’: Neoliberal Racial Regimes and the Katrina Circumstance,” Special issue of American Quarterly: In the Wake of Hurricane Katrina: New Paradigms and Social Visions 61.3 (September 2009): 693-717. 

    Reprinted in In the Wake of Hurricane Katrina: New Paradigms and Social Visions, ed. Clyde Woods (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2010), 267-291.

Review of Vijay Prashad, The Darker Nations: A People’s History of the Third World. Race & Class. 50.4 (April 2009): 100-103.

Review of Werner Bonefeld and Sergio Tischler, What is to be Done? Leninism, Anti-Leninist Marxism, and the Question of Revolution Today. Capital & Class 91 (Spring 2007): 137-140.

Review of Tom Mertes, ed., A Movement of Movements: Is Another World Really Possible? Humboldt Journal of Social Relations 29.2 (Spring 2005): 230-233.

Review of Terry Eagleton, After Theory. Humboldt Journal of Social Relations 28.2 (Fall 2004): 148-154.