Global Studies

Core Required Courses

GLS 701 Contemporary Global Studies (3 credits)  
The focus of this course will be on the intersection of theory and practice in Global Studies. None of the main theories of mainstream International Relations, a field that predated the discipline of Global Studies, could have predicted many of the events surrounding the end of the Cold War. Since then, the field of IR has become a site of serious theoretical critique and debate, with new or previously marginalized theories and approaches gaining attention and contending with the mainstream, even to the point of questioning the very definition of “IR.” The advent of Global Studies has been, in large part, a response to the disciplinary narrowness of IR and an attempt to develop a new field of interdisciplinary study that can more adequately help us negotiate the changing political, economic and cultural circumstances of the 21st century. In this course, we will focus on the way that theory from Global Studies and International Relations can inform practice and policy. Each student will select a recent international “event” (a news story, not an “issue”) to follow this semester and use as a case to apply the theories we will be engaging. By asking how would each theory or approach “see” an “event” or story, we may better understand the value, insights, and limits of each theory in understanding the world and our place in it.

GLS 702 Theoretical Paradigms in Global Studies (3 credits)
The course covers four main theoretical traditions in the study international relations, all of which focus on explaining two phenomena: conflict and cooperation. We will cover realism, liberalism, constructivism, and rationalism. The course will also review classic and contemporary U.S. and European theorizing and research relevant to media, culture, and communication. It is an advanced graduate seminar designed primarily for PhD students Global Studies at UMass Lowell.

GLS 703 Comparative and International Research (3 credits)
This course develops a student’s understanding of the challenges involved in comparative analysis of issues and data across multiple countries, and provides exposure to major global database resources (e.g. World Bank, UNESCO, UNODC). The course is designed to cultivate and further develop skills in research methods and data analysis as students become practitioners of research addressing a range of global studies issues. Both quantitative and qualitative research methods will be explored. GLS 703 is a pre-requisite for the three (3) advanced research methods or data analysis courses (3 credits each). 

GLS 706 International Experience (6 credits)
Students can complete either a 6-credit internship or other experiential learning experience, or they can substitute this requirement by registering for GLS 705 and one additional elective that shows a direct link to their dissertation research. More information is provided elsewhere in this Program Guide.

GLS 753 Dissertation Supervision (3 Credits)
At the dissertation stage of doctoral study, students register for 3, 6, or 9 credits of direct supervision with their dissertation advisor. Prerequisite: Doctoral Candidacy.

GLS 756 Dissertation Supervision (6 Credits)
At the dissertation stage of doctoral study, students register for 3, 6, or 9 credits of direct supervision with their dissertation advisor. Prerequisite: Doctoral Candidacy.

GLS 759 Dissertation Supervision (9 Credits)
At the dissertation stage of doctoral study, students register for 3, 6, or 9 credits of direct supervision with their dissertation advisor. Prerequisite: Doctoral Candidacy.