School of Criminology and Justice Studies

All courses, arranged by program, are listed in the catalog. Courses designated as “active” have been offered in the past three years. Courses designated as “inactive” have not been offered in the past three years and indicate the semester in which the course was last offered. If you cannot locate a specific course, try our advanced search link. Current class schedules, with posted days and times, may be found on the Registrar's Office website or by logging directly into iSiS.

44.503 Administration of Criminal Justice Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5428
Status Active

An examination of the components of the criminal justice system and a review of the administration of federal, state and local criminal justice agencies, including a focus on criminal law and procedure.

44.513 Crisis and Emergency Management Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 34637
Status Active

This course will provide a broad introduction to the critical challenges of disaster management. The course will address past and present strategies for reducing and responding to hazards posed by both manmade and natural disasters. Emphasis will be placed on what we can learn from the history of disasters, and on how we can apply those lessons to the management of future events.

44.521 Criminological Theory: Foundations Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5431
Status Active

This course provides a detailed examination of the best known and most influential theories of crime causation. Topics include: theory construction, hypothesis testing, theory integration, and the links among theory, research, and policy.

44.522 Victimology Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5432
Status Active

This course examines the study of crime victims and of the patterns, impact, and formal responses to criminal victimization. Particular attention is given to research issues such as measurement of victimization, fear of crime and related measures, and conducting research with victimized populations, as well as discussion of current issues in the field of Victimology. Substantive topics may include theories of victimization, the overlap between victims and offenders, social-psychological and other impacts of victimization on primary and secondary victims, media coverage of victimization, and evaluation of prevention and intervention programs for victims (criminal justice system based programs and others).

44.526 Domestic Terrorism and Violent Extremism Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5434
Status Active

This course examines bigotry and hate and how they are manifested in criminal behavior. Various groups who have been labeled as supporting or engaging in domestic terrorism are studied. Focus is placed on federal and state statutory laws and the dynamics of police, court, and corrections based responses to hate crimes and domestic terrorism.

44.541 Issues in Policing Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5439
Status Active

An introduction to research on the police, both basic research and applied, evaluative research. Since police discretion was �discovered� in the 1950s, basic research has focused on factors that explain the discretionary use (and abuse) of police authority, and particularly on factors that would signify bias in police decision-making, and also on the mechanisms by which police may be held accountable to the public. Evaluative research, beginning with the Kansas City Preventive Patrol Experiment in the 1970s, has been concerned with estimating the effects of programmatic and tactical innovations on social conditions�such as crime, fear of crime, satisfaction with police services and quality of life.

44.542 Criminal Profiling Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5440
Status Active

An overview of the development and characteristics of violent offenders, some of whom will evolve to become criminal psychopaths. The class provides an analytical understanding of the unique characteristics of serial criminals and the methodologies used to commit their crimes.

44.543 Forensic Psychology Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5441
Status Active

This course applies psychological theories, principles, and research to issues of concern to the criminal justice system with a special focus on the intersection of the mental health and criminal justice systems.

44.545 Criminal Mind and Behavior Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5443
Status Active

This course is designed to address a broad range of topics relevant to criminal behavior and the development of the so called criminal personality. Factors that are considered to influence the evolution of criminal mentality are examined and the laws and the past and current response of the criminal justice system to repeat offenders are explored.

44.546 Mental Health & Criminal Justice Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 33236
Status Active

The course focuses on how and why individuals with serious mental illness become involved in the criminal justice system, and on how the criminal justice and public mental health systems respond to that involvement. Topics include law enforcement responses, court-based strategies, mental health and corrections, community supervision of individuals with mental illness, violence and mental disorder, and unique challenges associated with female and juvenile populations.

44.554 Threat Assessment and Risk Management Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 32166
Status Active

The goal of this course is to enhance understanding and increase expertise regarding risk management and the impact of terrorism on economic and other critical infrastructures in the United States. The course will provide the tools (operational and statistical) and technology required to mitigate these risks. A second purpose of the course is to examine and critically discuss current and future methods to create best practices in security management.

44.560 Gender, Race & Crime Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5448
Status Active

The implications of criminal laws, criminal justice practices and programs. Focus on inequalities based on gender, race and class.

44.567 Overview of Homeland Security Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 32167
Status Active

The U.S. has embraced the homeland security monolith without a full understanding of what it encompasses. This course provides a comprehensive overview of homeland security and defense as undertaken in the United States since 9/11. The course critically examines the current body of knowledge with a specific focus on understanding security threats, sources, and reasons for these threats. The roles of the key players at the federal, state and local levels, the policies and procedures enacted since 9/11, and the homeland security system in practice are also examined.

44.568 Contemporary Security Studies Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 36405
Status Active

This course examines the complex nature of key domestic and international security threats and responses. Topics include terrorism and insurgency, transnational organized crime, WMD proliferation, cyber-security, intelligence, national and homeland security strategies, critical infrastructure protection, and theories of international security.

44.569 Scientific & Technological Dimensions of National Security Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37103
Status Active

In this required course for the MS in Security Studies program, students will take this course to learn all about the efforts in the public and private sector to design new sensors, scanner, and the general role of science and technology in homeland and national security.

44.570 Managing Criminal Justice Organizations Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5452
Status Active

A range of criminal justice management issues are addressed, including organizational structure, purpose, rewards and relationships, leadership and management styles, and the development of effective change strategies by criminal justice agencies. The complex role of the criminal justice manager in both the adult and juvenile justice system is emphasized.

44.573 Law and Public Policy Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5454
Status Active

The course is an introduction to crime and the efforts to control crime through public policy. We explore the foundations of the policy-making process at the federal, state, and local levels. The course also considers broad theoretical applications pertaining to public opinion, national culture, and comparative analyses among Western democracies and their differing approaches to crime. This course employs a variety of learning tools, from roundtable discussions to policy cases.

44.574 Economic Crime Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 35786
Status Active

Introduction to economic crime including nature, causes, consequence, investigation, and prevention. Empirical findings and major economic crime cases will also be examined.

44.575 Criminal Homicide Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 36676
Status Active

A survey of the nature and extent of criminal homicide. There will be five main components: statutory definitions of homicide; theories of homicide; homicide rates over time and across jurisdictions; trends and patterns in homicide characteristics; and cross-cultural comparisons. Homicide is an important topic in criminology for three reasons: (1) it is the crime of greatest severity in any penal code; (2) it is a fairly reliable barometer of all violent crime; and (3) at a national level, no other crime is measured as accurately, precisely, and comprehensively.

44.576 History of Terrorism and Counterterrorism Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37105
Status Active

This course will study the history and potential future of the global al-Qaida movement. Inspirational leaders, strategies, operations, tactics, finances and other key dimensions of this network will be examined in depth. The course will also examine specific vulnerabilities of a decentralized networked organization like al-Qaida, to include tactical control, strategic authority, dependence on technologies, and transactional integrity.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-req; CRIM 572 Terrorism/Counter-Terrorism (44.549).

44.577 Terrorist Networks Al Qaida and Affilated Groups Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37102
Status Active

This course will study the history and potential future of the global Al-Qaida movement. Inspirational leaders, strategies, operations, tactics, finances and other key dimensions of this network will be examined in depth. The course will also examine specific vulnerabilities of a decentralized networked organization like Al-Qaida, to include tactical control, strategic authority, dependence on technologies, and transactional integrity.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-req; CRIM 572 Terrorism/Counter-Terrorism (44.549).

44.578 Intelligence Analysis Policy and Practice Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37085
Status Active

Students will examine the tradecraft of intelligence collection and analysis from various perspectives. Topics will include strategies, tactics, legal and ethical implications, sources, means, methods, limitations, covert action, methods of analysis, and case studies of prominent intelligence successes and failures in the last half century.

44.580 Descriptive & Inferential Statistics Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5455
Status Active

This course is a rigorous introduction to statistical inference: probability theory, confidence intervals, and hypothesis tests. The course also covers regression analysis, which is developed in a non-technical way, with an emphasis on interpretation of regression results, using examples from recent research.

44.588 Strategic Intelligence and Homeland Security Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 32202
Status Active

This course is designed to provide an overview of the past, present, and future role of intelligence in national security. The course addresses the development and institutional structure of intelligence organizations and explains their purpose, roles, responsibilities, and realms of authority. It also provides an overview on oversight and accountability of intelligence agencies, intelligence cultures, the impact of technology, the development of collection and analytic capabilities, and the iteraction between intelligence and policy. The course makes extensive use of case studies to examine incidents where intelligence played a significant role and the dilemmas in its application, primarily in the areas of national security and military policy.

44.590 Research Design Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5456
Status Active

Research design is a graduate-level introduction to methodology as used in criminology/criminal justice. The course surveys the research design enterprise and covers a host of issues on the measurement and collection of data, and other procedures that influence whether a research study will lead the investigator to scientifically rigorous information. This course explains various strategies for devising social science studies, compares the relative benefits of various designs, and identifies the tools necessary to conduct studies that will yield data worthy of analysis and interpretation. This material will be valuable for students who will conduct research and administrators who must evaluate the research of others.

44.594 Crime Analysis and Mapping Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5460
Status Active

This course examines the use of new technologies to analyze crime patterns and develop crime prevention strategies. Students study theories that explain the geographic distribution of crime and learn how to use Geographic Information Systems to study crime in ways that draw upon theory as well as how to apply GIS techniques in the law enforcement and corrections fields.

44.595 Program Evaluation Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5461
Status Active

A detailed examination of methods of evaluating criminal justice programs. Focuses on both process and outcome evaluation.

44.599 Criminal Justice Intelligence and Information Sharing Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 32203
Status Active

A primary function of law enforcement is the gathering of information. However, information by itself does little to support the law enforcement mission. Intelligence, in the context of law enforcement, is the outcome of rigorous analysis of information, and often generates key decisions and/or guides tactical strategies that help facilitate the enforcement mission. This course examines the role of information and intelligence in defining and achieving the law enforcement mission. Problem solving tools such as SARA, and management tools like COMPSTAT, which rely heavily on both information and intelligence, are discussed. In a world now confronted by the threat of terrorism, the course examines the sharing/lack of sharing of information and intelligence among local law enforcement and federal agencies and the impact of this contentious relationship.

44.622 Intimate Partner Violence Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5463
Status Active

An examination of the nature and extent of intimate partner violence and an analysis of the causes and consequences of violence between partners as well as the latest research regarding the criminal justice response.

44.623 Responding to Child Maltreatment Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5464
Status Active

Introduction to empirical findings and theoretical perspectives concerned with the maltreatment of children and youth. Includes an examination of prevalence rates, risk factors, consequences, and system responses.

44.624 Violence in America Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5465
Status Active

This course provides an in-depth analysis of the causes, context, and control of a wide range of violent crimes. Topics covered in this class include: Murder, rape, robbery, assault, and violence in the helping professions, the workplace, school, gang violence, cult violence, and institutional violence. For each form of violence, we examine issues related to(1) the extent of the problem, characteristics of the crime, victim, and offender, (2) causation, (3) crime prevention, and (4)crime control strategies.

44.625 Juvenile Justice and Youth Crime Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37082
Status Active

Examines the historical development of juvenile justice in the U.S., how the juvenile justice system operates, the rationale for treating juveniles differently from adults, and the extent of youth crime in the United States according to official statistics and self-report data.

44.642 Issues in Computer Crime and Cyber Security Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37097
Status Active

This course will examine the history and evolving nature of the relationship between technology, crime, and security, with a particular focus on legitimate and illegitimate Internet commerce, and cyber criminal methodologies and techniques. We will study major issues in cyber security including criminal and state-sponsored hacking; data, intellectual property, and identity theft; financial and personal data security; cyber-terrorism; tools and methods used to exploit computer networks, and strategies to protect against them; and new and emerging technologies. This course will be taught specifically for non-computer science majors, although students with computer science backgrounds are welcome for the experiences that they can bring to the class discussions.

44.643 Weapons of Mass Destruction Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37100
Status Active

This course explores the threats that weapons of mass destruction (WMD) pose to the U.S. and its interests along with the strategies to meet those threats. The course will examine the technical aspects, history, and contemporary threat of each category of weapon Chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear followed by a critical analysis of U.S. and global efforts to limit access to these weapons and prohibit their production, proliferation and use. The course will also review some aspects of WMD attack response, recovery, and mitigation.

44.644 Global Trafficking and Criminal Networks Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37101
Status Active

Illicit economic activities are a global phenomenon with local impact. This course will examine the threat that global trafficking poses to a nation�s security, political stability, economic development, and social fabric. The lessons in this advanced graduate-level seminar are organized around the trafficking activities of greatest concern to the United Nations, Interpol, IAEA and other international agencies � as well as to the U.S. Departments of State, Defense, Justice, and Homeland Security.

44.646 Sex Crimes and Offenders Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 32172
Status Active

This course examines the nature of sex offenses as well as the mind of the sex offender, and focuses on motives, possible victims, and rehabilitation. The responses of the mental health and criminal justice systems are examined and the effectiveness of those responses is assessed.

44.650 Community Based Correction Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5470
Status Active

This course presents a detailed examination of current theory, research, and policy development in the field of community corrections, both nationally and internationally. Topic areas include sentencing, probation, parole, fines, community service, and intermediate sanctions (intensive supervision, house arrest/electronic monitoring, boot camps). Issues include the punishment vs. control argument, community justice models, special offender populations (drug offenders, sex offenders, mentally ill offenders, AIDS), and the cost effectiveness of community corrections.

44.680 Selected Topics Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5473
Status Active

A comprehensive examination of a current issue in criminal justice.

44.689 Special topics in Criminal Justice and Criminology Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37106
Status Active

Special topics classes are used to address timely issues that do not fit into the regular course offerings.

44.691 Directed Study in Criminal Justice Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5478
Status Active

This course is designed as an independent study of a subject not offered in the standard curriculum.

44.697 Security Studies Project Design and Defense Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37111
Status Active

Under faculty supervision, students in the MS in Security Studies program will design a science or technology-related project that demonstrates mastery in a subject relevant to security. Examples could include chemical or biological sensors, computer firewall intrusion detection system, baggage scanners, signals interception device, etc.

44.699 Security Studies Capstone Research Paper Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37113
Status Active

This course represents the culminating capstone experience for students in the MA in Security Studies program at UMass Lowell. Incorporating the tools learned in 44.590, Research Design and Methods, students are required to design a research question, gather and analyze information, and write a Masters level research paper of at least 50 pages on a topic of their choosing related to security studies. Students will provide drafts of their paper to their faculty supervisor periodically during the semester, and the final version will be submitter for grading on the basis of quality research and writing.

44.741 Thesis Review Credits: 1

Course Details
Min Credits 1
Max Credits 1
Course ID 35263
Status Active

44.743 Master's Thesis - Criminal Justice Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5488
Status Active

44.746 Master's Thesis - Criminal Justice Credits: 6

Course Details
Min Credits 6
Max Credits 6
Course ID 5489
Status Active

44.749 Master's Thesis - Criminal Justice Credits: 9

Course Details
Min Credits 9
Max Credits 9
Course ID 5490
Status Active

CRIM.501 Criminological Theory: Foundations Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5431
Status Active

This course provides a detailed examination of the best known and most influential theories of crime causation. Topics include: theory construction, hypothesis testing, theory integration, and the links among theory, research, and policy.

CRIM.520 Administration of Criminal Justice Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5428
Status Active

An examination of the components of the criminal justice system and a review of the administration of federal, state and local criminal justice agencies, including a focus on criminal law and procedure.

CRIM.521 Managing Criminal Justice Organizations Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5452
Status Active

A range of criminal justice management issues are addressed, including organizational structure, purpose, rewards and relationships, leadership and management styles, and the development of effective change strategies by criminal justice agencies. The complex role of the criminal justice manager in both the adult and juvenile justice system is emphasized.

CRIM.522 Issues in Policing Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5439
Status Active

An introduction to research on the police, both basic research and applied, evaluative research. Since police discretion was �discovered� in the 1950s, basic research has focused on factors that explain the discretionary use (and abuse) of police authority, and particularly on factors that would signify bias in police decision-making, and also on the mechanisms by which police may be held accountable to the public. Evaluative research, beginning with the Kansas City Preventive Patrol Experiment in the 1970s, has been concerned with estimating the effects of programmatic and tactical innovations on social conditions�such as crime, fear of crime, satisfaction with police services and quality of life.

CRIM.523 Courts and sentencing Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37081
Status Active

Examines the various philosophies and theories of punishment and the distinct court structures and approaches to sentencing. Students will explore recent changes in sentencing policies and will study the social and economic costs of incarceration. We will examine sentencing disparities and their appropriateness based on offender and victim characteristics such as race and gender. Explores the debates regarding contemporary sentencing practices and investigates the increasing use of specialized courts and their effectiveness.

CRIM.525 Juvenile Justice and Youth Crime Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37082
Status Active

Examines the historical development of juvenile justice in the U.S., how the juvenile justice system operates, the rationale for treating juveniles differently from adults, and the extent of youth crime in the United States according to official statistics and self-report data.

CRIM.526 Economic Crime Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 35786
Status Active

Introduction to economic crime including nature, causes, consequence, investigation, and prevention. Empirical findings and major economic crime cases will also be examined.

CRIM.540 Criminal Profiling Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5440
Status Active

An overview of the development and characteristics of violent offenders, some of whom will evolve to become criminal psychopaths. The class provides an analytical understanding of the unique characteristics of serial criminals and the methodologies used to commit their crimes.

CRIM.541 Forensic Psychology Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5441
Status Active

This course applies psychological theories, principles, and research to issues of concern to the criminal justice system with a special focus on the intersection of the mental health and criminal justice systems.

CRIM.570 Crisis and Emergency Management Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 34637
Status Active

This course will provide a broad introduction to the critical challenges of disaster management. The course will address past and present strategies for reducing and responding to hazards posed by both manmade and natural disasters. Emphasis will be placed on what we can learn from the history of disasters, and on how we can apply those lessons to the management of future events.

CRIM.571 Domestic Terrorism and Violent Extremism Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5434
Status Active

This course examines bigotry and hate and how they are manifested in criminal behavior. Various groups who have been labeled as supporting or engaging in domestic terrorism are studied. Focus is placed on federal and state statutory laws and the dynamics of police, court, and corrections based responses to hate crimes and domestic terrorism.

CRIM.573 Threat Assessment and Risk Management Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 32166
Status Active

The goal of this course is to enhance understanding and increase expertise regarding risk management and the impact of terrorism on economic and other critical infrastructures in the United States. The course will provide the tools (operational and statistical) and technology required to mitigate these risks. A second purpose of the course is to examine and critically discuss current and future methods to create best practices in security management.

CRIM.574 Overview of Homeland Security Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 32167
Status Active

The U.S. has embraced the homeland security monolith without a full understanding of what it encompasses. This course provides a comprehensive overview of homeland security and defense as undertaken in the United States since 9/11. The course critically examines the current body of knowledge with a specific focus on understanding security threats, sources, and reasons for these threats. The roles of the key players at the federal, state and local levels, the policies and procedures enacted since 9/11, and the homeland security system in practice are also examined.

CRIM.575 Contemporary Security Studies Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 36405
Status Active

This course examines the complex nature of key domestic and international security threats and responses. Topics include terrorism and insurgency, transnational organized crime, WMD proliferation, cyber-security, intelligence, national and homeland security strategies, critical infrastructure protection, and theories of international security.

CRIM.576 Criminal Justice Intelligence and Information Sharing Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 32203
Status Active

A primary function of law enforcement is the gathering of information. However, information by itself does little to support the law enforcement mission. Intelligence, in the context of law enforcement, is the outcome of rigorous analysis of information, and often generates key decisions and/or guides tactical strategies that help facilitate the enforcement mission. This course examines the role of information and intelligence in defining and achieving the law enforcement mission. Problem solving tools such as SARA, and management tools like COMPSTAT, which rely heavily on both information and intelligence, are discussed. In a world now confronted by the threat of terrorism, the course examines the sharing/lack of sharing of information and intelligence among local law enforcement and federal agencies and the impact of this contentious relationship.

CRIM.578 Intelligence Analysis Policy and Practice Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37085
Status Active

Students will examine the tradecraft of intelligence collection and analysis from various perspectives. Topics will include strategies, tactics, legal and ethical implications, sources, means, methods, limitations, covert action, methods of analysis, and case studies of prominent intelligence successes and failures in the last half century.

CRIM.583 Master's Thesis - Criminal Justice Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5488
Status Active

CRIM.586 Master's Thesis - Criminal Justice Credits: 6

Course Details
Min Credits 6
Max Credits 6
Course ID 5489
Status Active

CRIM.590 Descriptive & Inferential Statistics Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5455
Status Active

This course is a rigorous introduction to statistical inference: probability theory, confidence intervals, and hypothesis tests. The course also covers regression analysis, which is developed in a non-technical way, with an emphasis on interpretation of regression results, using examples from recent research.

CRIM.591 Research Design Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5456
Status Active

Research design is a graduate-level introduction to methodology as used in criminology/criminal justice. The course surveys the research design enterprise and covers a host of issues on the measurement and collection of data, and other procedures that influence whether a research study will lead the investigator to scientifically rigorous information. This course explains various strategies for devising social science studies, compares the relative benefits of various designs, and identifies the tools necessary to conduct studies that will yield data worthy of analysis and interpretation. This material will be valuable for students who will conduct research and administrators who must evaluate the research of others.

CRIM.601 Criminological Theory Advanced Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37083
Status Active

The course examines contemporary criminological thought by assessing major theories that anchor the discipline of criminology. Also explores the causal structure of these theories, the level of analysis at which they reside, the assumptions that underlie them, their strengths and weaknesses, and their policy implications.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-req: CRIM 501 Criminological Theory: Foundations, and CJC-PHD students only.

CRIM.602 Nature and Extent of Crime and Criminals Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37084
Status Active

Exposes students to the major measurement methods for the incidence of crime and prevalence of criminals. Students will become versed in using data derived from any of the three primary sources of crime statistics: police-based measures (UCR, NIBRS), victim surveys (NCVS), and self-reports of criminal behavior (Monitoring the Future, National Youth Survey).

Pre/Co-Requisites: PhD Students only Pre-req

CRIM.603 Correlates of Crime and Justice Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37751
Status Active

This course examines the nature of the relationships among attributes and indices at the individual, situational, and aggregate levels to various forms of crime and systems of justice. The implications of criminal laws, criminal justice practices, and programs are examined with a focus on inequalities based on gender and race.

Pre/Co-Requisites: PhD Students only Pre-req

CRIM.611 Law and Social Control Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37086
Status Active

This course examines and analyzes the various means by which society attempts to control criminal conduct. Social control encompasses both formal and informal mechanisms and a variety of institutions and social processes to deter inappropriate conduct, if possible, and/or punish and reform such conduct. Social control has evolved considerably over time and various social control philosophies and techniques have been prevalent at one time but not in others. Because social control is a response to inappropriate conduct, the course will also provide a brief introduction to the concepts of deviance and crime and the differential social control needs and priorities posed by different kinds of inappropriate conduct.

CRIM.612 Drugs, Crime and Justice Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37087
Status Active

This course surveys the historical development and contemporary context of the use of criminal sanctions to combat the use of illicit drugs. The relationship between drug use/abuse and crime is explored. The course also provides a policy analysis of the alternative means available to deal with the drugs-crime issue (legalization, decriminalization, interdiction, tougher criminalization).

CRIM.613 Law and Public Policy Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5454
Status Active

The course is an introduction to crime and the efforts to control crime through public policy. We explore the foundations of the policy-making process at the federal, state, and local levels. The course also considers broad theoretical applications pertaining to public opinion, national culture, and comparative analyses among Western democracies and their differing approaches to crime. This course employs a variety of learning tools, from roundtable discussions to policy cases.

CRIM.622 Seminar in Policing Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37088
Status Active

This seminar examines the contemporary research literature in policing with a focus on the key research issues. Through a critical examination of the literature, students gain an understanding of the significant topic areas that have been pursued and develop an agenda for further research.

CRIM.623 Seminar in Courts and Sentencing Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37089
Status Active

This seminar examines the contemporary research literature in adjudication and sentencing with a focus on the key research issues. Through a critical examination of the literature, students gain an understanding of the significant topic areas that have been pursued and develop an agenda for further research.

CRIM.624 Seminar in Corrections Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37090
Status Active

This seminar examines the contemporary research literature on institutional corrections with a focus on the key research issues. Through a critical examination of the literature, students gain an understanding of the significant topic areas that have been pursued and develop an agenda for further research.

CRIM.625 Seminar in Juvenile Justice and Youth Crime Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37091
Status Active

This seminar examines the contemporary research literature concerning juvenile justice with a focus on the key research issues. Through a critical examination of the literature, students gain an understanding of the significant topical areas that have been pursued and develop an agenda for further research.

CRIM.626 Community Based Correction Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5470
Status Active

This course presents a detailed examination of current theory, research, and policy development in the field of community corrections, both nationally and internationally. Topic areas include sentencing, probation, parole, fines, community service, and intermediate sanctions (intensive supervision, house arrest/electronic monitoring, boot camps). Issues include the punishment vs. control argument, community justice models, special offender populations (drug offenders, sex offenders, mentally ill offenders, AIDS), and the cost effectiveness of community corrections.

CRIM.627 Technology, Crime, and Social Control Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37092
Status Active

This course examines the application of new technological advances in the criminal justice system. Topic areas include the new technology of crime commission, and the corresponding new technology of crime control strategies. Our focus will be on the application of both �hard� technology (e.g. equipment, hardware, devices, etc) and �soft� technology (e.g. computer software programs, information systems, classification devices, and other problem-solving applications) in each of the following areas: crime prevention, police, courts, institutional corrections, community corrections and the private sector.

CRIM.628 Innovation and Leadership in Criminal justice Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37093
Status Active

This course critically examines one of the core concepts of criminology and criminal justice: change--at the individual, group, and organizational levels. There is a �brief history� of change in police, court, and correctional organizations, focusing primarily on major reform initiatives and change strategies introduced by criminal justice managers over the past fifty years (e.g. in policing--problem-oriented and broken windows policing, in the courts--federal mandatory sentencing and parole abolition, specialized courts, and in corrections--the new techno-prison, privatization of institutional and community corrections, control-oriented community supervision). For each part of the criminal justice system, we examine the major types of change strategies employed by criminal justice managers to implement major reforms: empirical rational, normative re-educative, and power coercive strategies.

CRIM.630 Victimology Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5432
Status Active

This course examines the study of crime victims and of the patterns, impact, and formal responses to criminal victimization. Particular attention is given to research issues such as measurement of victimization, fear of crime and related measures, and conducting research with victimized populations, as well as discussion of current issues in the field of Victimology. Substantive topics may include theories of victimization, the overlap between victims and offenders, social-psychological and other impacts of victimization on primary and secondary victims, media coverage of victimization, and evaluation of prevention and intervention programs for victims (criminal justice system based programs and others).

CRIM.631 Intimate Partner Violence Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5463
Status Active

An examination of the nature and extent of intimate partner violence and an analysis of the causes and consequences of violence between partners as well as the latest research regarding the criminal justice response.

CRIM.632 Responding to Child Maltreatment Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5464
Status Active

Introduction to empirical findings and theoretical perspectives concerned with the maltreatment of children and youth. Includes an examination of prevalence rates, risk factors, consequences, and system responses.

CRIM.640 Criminal Mind and Behavior Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5443
Status Active

This course is designed to address a broad range of topics relevant to criminal behavior and the development of the so called criminal personality. Factors that are considered to influence the evolution of criminal mentality are examined and the laws and the past and current response of the criminal justice system to repeat offenders are explored.

CRIM.641 Mental Health & Criminal Justice Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 33236
Status Active

The course focuses on how and why individuals with serious mental illness become involved in the criminal justice system, and on how the criminal justice and public mental health systems respond to that involvement. Topics include law enforcement responses, court-based strategies, mental health and corrections, community supervision of individuals with mental illness, violence and mental disorder, and unique challenges associated with female and juvenile populations.

CRIM.642 Sex Crimes and Offenders Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 32172
Status Active

This course examines the nature of sex offenses as well as the mind of the sex offender, and focuses on motives, possible victims, and rehabilitation. The responses of the mental health and criminal justice systems are examined and the effectiveness of those responses is assessed.

CRIM.650 Violence in America Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5465
Status Active

This course provides an in-depth analysis of the causes, context, and control of a wide range of violent crimes. Topics covered in this class include: Murder, rape, robbery, assault, and violence in the helping professions, the workplace, school, gang violence, cult violence, and institutional violence. For each form of violence, we examine issues related to(1) the extent of the problem, characteristics of the crime, victim, and offender, (2) causation, (3) crime prevention, and (4)crime control strategies.

CRIM.651 Criminal Homicide Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 36676
Status Active

A survey of the nature and extent of criminal homicide. There will be five main components: statutory definitions of homicide; theories of homicide; homicide rates over time and across jurisdictions; trends and patterns in homicide characteristics; and cross-cultural comparisons. Homicide is an important topic in criminology for three reasons: (1) it is the crime of greatest severity in any penal code; (2) it is a fairly reliable barometer of all violent crime; and (3) at a national level, no other crime is measured as accurately, precisely, and comprehensively.

CRIM.653 Gangs Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37094
Status Active

An introduction to the study of gang problems in the U.S. by exploring the nature of gangs, including issues such as defining gangs, types of gangs, female gang involvement, etc. The course also examines theory and methods of understanding gangs and the group process of gangs and investigates the criminal involvement of gangs, focusing on gang members� Involvement in extortion, drugs, violence, and other crimes. Also examines programs for social intervention and law enforcement, and policy issues.

CRIM.656 Criminal Careers Foundations Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37095
Status Active

This course examines the concept of the �Criminal career� By examining the scholarly progression through which this term has evolved. We will investigate three main venues: (1) the research that originated in the early 1900's at the University of Chicago (Shaw and Sutherland); (2) the work of the Gluecks between 1930 and 1957; and (3) the two Philadelphia Birth Cohort Studies. These three research venues are largely responsible for the origin and sustenance of the criminal career paradigm in criminology.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-req; CRIM 602 Nature & Extent of Crime & Criminals, and CRIM 603 Gender, Race, and Crime.

CRIM.657 Criminal Careers Contemporary Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37096
Status Active

Examines contemporary research on the "criminal career paradigm" which has dominated criminological research over the past 20 to 25 years. Despite a widely held belief that this area of inquiry has been significant, desirable, worthwhile, etc., there have been a number of polemical publications that have spawned a debate over the yield attained through criminal career research on the one hand, and the value of or necessity for a longitudinal approach to studying criminal behavior on the other. These debates will be examined and the nature of contemporary inquiry into criminal careers will be examined.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-req: CRIM 654 Ellite Deviance and White Collar Crime.

CRIM.658 Issues in Computer Crime and Cyber Security Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37097
Status Active

This course will examine the history and evolving nature of the relationship between technology, crime, and security, with a particular focus on legitimate and illegitimate Internet commerce, and cyber criminal methodologies and techniques. We will study major issues in cyber security including criminal and state-sponsored hacking; data, intellectual property, and identity theft; financial and personal data security; cyber-terrorism; tools and methods used to exploit computer networks, and strategies to protect against them; and new and emerging technologies. This course will be taught specifically for non-computer science majors, although students with computer science backgrounds are welcome for the experiences that they can bring to the class discussions.

CRIM.662 Global Issues and Human Rights and Justice Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37098
Status Active

This course examines the impact of global issues on crime and justice and the intersection of social control and human rights approaches to crime. The course interweaves readings, lectures and discussion of justice and law; security and safety; socio-economic development; and comparative cultures and institutions in an examination of the impact of globalization, migration, labor exploitation, war and transnational agendas on the construction of crime, the development and control of criminal opportunity structures, and legal/ justice system responses. It examines the complex interactions between global context, human rights and social control approaches to crime. Topics include human trafficking; children and war; refugees and migration; and transnational crime in a global economy.

CRIM.663 Prisons A Global Perspective Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37099
Status Active

This course provides a comprehensive, global assessment of the use/misuse of prisons and jails in North America (U.S. focus), and in other parts of the world, including selected countries in Europe, Asia, Africa, and South America. A broad range of topics are compared among U.S. and global policies and practices. Topics include: (1) who goes to prison and why; (2) sentencing disparity and sentencing reform movements; (3) prison life and prison organization; (4) prison classification; (5) inmate, staff, and management culture; (6) prison violence and disorder; (7) treatment programs; (8) the links between prison culture and community culture; (9) the prospects for offender change; and (10) offender reentry.

CRIM.664 Weapons of Mass Destruction Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37100
Status Active

This course explores the threats that weapons of mass destruction (WMD) pose to the U.S. and its interests along with the strategies to meet those threats. The course will examine the technical aspects, history, and contemporary threat of each category of weapon Chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear followed by a critical analysis of U.S. and global efforts to limit access to these weapons and prohibit their production, proliferation and use. The course will also review some aspects of WMD attack response, recovery, and mitigation.

CRIM.665 Global Trafficking and Criminal Networks Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37101
Status Active

Illicit economic activities are a global phenomenon with local impact. This course will examine the threat that global trafficking poses to a nation�s security, political stability, economic development, and social fabric. The lessons in this advanced graduate-level seminar are organized around the trafficking activities of greatest concern to the United Nations, Interpol, IAEA and other international agencies � as well as to the U.S. Departments of State, Defense, Justice, and Homeland Security.

CRIM.666 Terrorist Networks Al Qaida and Affilated Groups Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37102
Status Active

This course will study the history and potential future of the global Al-Qaida movement. Inspirational leaders, strategies, operations, tactics, finances and other key dimensions of this network will be examined in depth. The course will also examine specific vulnerabilities of a decentralized networked organization like Al-Qaida, to include tactical control, strategic authority, dependence on technologies, and transactional integrity.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-req; CRIM 572 Terrorism/Counter-Terrorism (44.549).

CRIM.667 Advanced Security Studies Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37126
Status Active

This course examines the complex nature of key domestic and international security threats and how nations respond to them. While the traditional focus of security studies has been the phenomenon of war, the past two decades have seen tremendous growth and expansion of the field. Some scholars have studied the threat, use and control of military force, while others have studied various forms of political violence such as terrorism, organized crime, and insurgency or armed rebellion. Research in this field also incorporates scholarship on the politics of defense and foreign policymaking, traditional theories of international relations, comparative analysis of national and regional case studies, ethics and morality of security policies, and transnational issues like arms trafficking, piracy, and the proliferation of materials and technology for weapons of mass destruction. Overall, the study of national and international security has evolved into a complex, interdisciplinary field, as demonstrated on the list of journals and websites provided on the last page of this syllabus. Each lesson in this course draws on a large and diverse body of readings, including academic journal articles, government reports, and original source materials.

CRIM.668 Scientific & Technological Dimensions of National Security Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37103
Status Active

In this required course for the MS in Security Studies program, students will take this course to learn all about the efforts in the public and private sector to design new sensors, scanner, and the general role of science and technology in homeland and national security.

CRIM.669 History of Terrorism and Counterterrorism Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37105
Status Active

This course will study the history and potential future of the global al-Qaida movement. Inspirational leaders, strategies, operations, tactics, finances and other key dimensions of this network will be examined in depth. The course will also examine specific vulnerabilities of a decentralized networked organization like al-Qaida, to include tactical control, strategic authority, dependence on technologies, and transactional integrity.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-req; CRIM 572 Terrorism/Counter-Terrorism (44.549).

CRIM.683 Directed Study Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 38163
Status Active

This course is designed as an independent study of a subject not offered in the standard curriculum.

CRIM.689 Special topics in Criminal Justice and Criminology Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37106
Status Active

Special topics classes are used to address timely issues that do not fit into the regular course offerings.

CRIM.690 Advanced Regression Analysis Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37107
Status Active

This course focuses on statistical methods that are useful in the investigation of hypotheses in the social sciences and the analysis of public policies and programs. The bulk of the course is a detailed examination of the bivariate and multiple regression models estimated using Ordinary Least Squares (OLS), with an emphasis on constructing regression models to test social and economic hypotheses. Several special topics in regression analysis are addressed as well, including violations of OLS assumptions and the use of dummy variables, and interaction effects. Throughout, examples are dawn from the literature so students can see the models and methods in action.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-req: CRIM 590 Descriptive and Inferential Statistics, and CJC-PHD students only.

CRIM.691 Advanced Research Design Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37108
Status Active

This course focuses on measurement and data development strategies and techniques to facilitate effective statistical analysis. Topics include the logic of causal inquiry and inference, the elaboration paradigm and model specification, handling threats to internal validity, hierarchies of design structure (experimental, quasi-experimental and non-experimental), linking design structure to affect estimation strategies, and analyzing design elements in published literature. Students will select a research topic in consultation with the instructor and prepare a written comparative design analysis.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-req: CRIM.591 Research Design, and CJC-PHD Students only.

CRIM.692 Qualitative Research Methods Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37109
Status Active

This course designed to increase students� knowledge and understanding of the design and process of qualitative research in criminology. The material covered in this course includes the nature and uses of qualitative research; the design of qualitative research; grounded theory and the use of qualitative research to advance new theories and critically evaluate tenants or assumptions of widely held explanations of criminal behavior and justice system functioning; and the ethics of qualitative research. Qualitative research methodologies including ethnography, case studies, participant observation, interviewing, content analysis, and life history narrative / life course analysis will be studied. Students will develop and initiate their own qualitative research and learn first-hand about the conduct of such research, the sequencing of data collection, data analysis, and more data collection. Students will learn the uses of computer assisted software programs designed to assist qualitative data analysis.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-req: CRIM 591 Research Design.

CRIM.693 Survey Methods Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37110
Status Active

This course exposes students to the use of survey methods in social science research. Emphasis is placed on interview and questionnaire techniques and the construction and sequencing of survey questions as well as the use of Likert and Thurstone sales. Attention is also devoted to sampling theory, sampling designs, and sampling and non-sampling errors.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-req: CRIM 591 Research Design.

CRIM.694 Crime Analysis and Mapping Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5460
Status Active

This course examines the use of new technologies to analyze crime patterns and develop crime prevention strategies. Students study theories that explain the geographic distribution of crime and learn how to use Geographic Information Systems to study crime in ways that draw upon theory as well as how to apply GIS techniques in the law enforcement and corrections fields.

CRIM.695 Program Evaluation Methods Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 38183
Status Active

An examination of the methods and techniques of evaluation research. Evaluation research includes the issues that characterize the generic research enterprise. In addition to the usual research concerns and problems, evaluation research must also address problems that are unique to determining whether a program, treatment, law, or policy, has had the desired effect when implemented in practice. This task is especially problematic with social policy contexts. The agenda for the course has two main components. First, the course will concern the structural features of designing and conducting a program evaluation. The second component will be an analysis of actual program evaluations in the literature.

CRIM.697 Security Studies Project Design and Defense Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37111
Status Active

Under faculty supervision, students in the MS in Security Studies program will design a science or technology-related project that demonstrates mastery in a subject relevant to security. Examples could include chemical or biological sensors, computer firewall intrusion detection system, baggage scanners, signals interception device, etc.

CRIM.699 Security Studies Capstone Research Paper Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37113
Status Active

This course represents the culminating capstone experience for students in the MA in Security Studies program at UMass Lowell. Incorporating the tools learned in 44.590, Research Design and Methods, students are required to design a research question, gather and analyze information, and write a Masters level research paper of at least 50 pages on a topic of their choosing related to security studies. Students will provide drafts of their paper to their faculty supervisor periodically during the semester, and the final version will be submitter for grading on the basis of quality research and writing.

CRIM.701 Dissertation Seminar I Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37114
Status Active

This is the first part of a two-semester sequence in which students develop a plan and a template for the conduct of the various stages of the doctoral dissertation. Topics include: theoretical foundations, hypothesis development, sampling design, construct measurement, data collection, and analysis of quantitative or qualitative data.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-req: Advanced PhD Standing, and CJC-PHD Students only.

CRIM.702 Dissertation Seminar II Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37115
Status Active

This is the second part of a two-semester sequence in which students develop a plan and a template for the conduct of the various stages of the doctoral dissertation. Topics include: theoretical foundations, hypothesis development, sampling design, construct measurement, data collection, and analysis of quantitative or qualitative data.

Pre/Co-Requisites: PhD Students only Pre-req

CRIM.703 Dissertation supervision Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37116
Status Active

At the dissertation stage of doctoral study, students register for 3, 6, or 9 credits of direct supervision with their dissertation advisor.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: Advanced PhD standing.

CRIM.706 Dissertation Supervision Credits: 6

Course Details
Min Credits 6
Max Credits 6
Course ID 37117
Status Active

At the dissertation stage of doctoral study, students register for 3, 6, or 9 credits of direct supervision with their dissertation advisor.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: Advanced PhD standing.

CRIM.709 Dissertation Supervision Credits: 9

Course Details
Min Credits 9
Max Credits 9
Course ID 37119
Status Active

At the dissertation stage of doctoral study, students register for 3, 6, or 9 credits of direct supervision with their dissertation advisor.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: Advanced PhD standing.

CRIM.711 Continued Dissertation Review Credits: 1

Course Details
Min Credits 1
Max Credits 1
Course ID 39074
Status Active

This course allows doctoral students continuous registration to finalize dissertation research and or dissertation document.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Criminal Justice PhD Students Only, Pre-Req:CRIM703, or CRIM706 or CRIM709.

CRIM.716 Dissertation Seminar Accelerated Credits: 6

Course Details
Min Credits 6
Max Credits 6
Course ID 38706
Status Active

This course is an accelerated version of the CRIM 701/702 sequence. It is suitable for students who have already acquired the data for their doctoral thesis research and thus can accomplish the plan and template for the conduct of the various stages of the doctoral dissertation in one semester. Topics include: theoretical foundations, hypothesis development, sampling design, construct measurement, data collection, and analysis of quantitative or qualitative data. Prerequisite: Doctoral Candidacy in Criminology.

CRIM.790 Categorical and Limited Dependent Variables Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37120
Status Active

The estimation of empirical models is essential to public policy analysis and social science research. Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) regression analysis is the most frequently used empirical model, and is appropriate for analyzing continuous dependent variables that meet certain distributional assumptions. This course examines several types of advanced regression models for dependent variables that violate one or more of the assumptions of the OLS regression model. For example, some dependent variables may be categorical, such as pregnant or not, employed or not, etc. Other dependent variables may be truncated or censored, such as contributions to an individual retirement account that are limited by law to certain dollar amounts. Still others may be counts of things, like the number of children born to a given woman or the number of traffic accidents on a given day. The principal models examined in the course are binary logit and probit, multinomial logit, ordinal logit and probit, tobit, and the family of Poisson regression models. The Heckman correction for selection and Event History Analysis are also addressed. All these models are estimated using maximum likelihood estimation (MLE). The course focuses on the application and interpretation of the models, rather than statistical theory.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-req: Crim.690 Advanced Regression Analysis and PhD students only.

CRIM.791 Structural Equation Modeling Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37121
Status Active

This course is an introduction to structural equation modeling (SEM). SEM represents a general approach to the statistical examination of the fit of a theoretical model to empirical data. Topics include observed variable (path) analysis, latent variable models (e.g., confirmatory factor analysis), and latent variable SEM analyses.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: CRIM 690 Advanced Regression Analysis.

CRIM.792 Survival Analysis and Longitudinal Data Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37122
Status Active

Criminological research often involves the study of change over time in both individuals and groups. Analyzing such over time poses a number of methodological and statistical challenges, however, and these must be addressed to derive valid inferences from data analysis. This course will examine several techniques that are appropriate for such analyses. These include the family of univariate, bivariate and multivariate techniques collectively known as �survival� or �event history analysis� that are appropriate for studying processes such as recidivism and length of time individuals spend in various programs. The course will also describe zero-inflated Poisson trajectory and latent growth curve models, as well as multilevel models for change. Emphasis will be on application as opposed to theory.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-req: Crim.690 Advanced Regression Analysis and PhD students only.

CRIM.793 Data Reduction and Factor Analysis Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37123
Status Active

Criminologists are often confronted with datasets containing numerous variables resulting from surveys and archival data extraction. It is advantageous to reduce the number of variables while still maintaining the integrity of the measurement of crucial concepts. Factor analysis is a valuable statistical technique for reducing the number of variables and detecting possible underlying structure (s) in the relationships among variables. This course will examine major factor analytic techniques such as Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) designed to find underlying unobservable (latent) variables that are reflected in the observed variables or manifest variables. In addition the course will examine the various factor rotation procedures commonly used to ensure that the derived factors or dimensions are orthogonal and do not either introduce multi-collinearity problems or exacerbate collinearity issues already present in the data.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: CRIM 690 Advanced Regression Analysis.