Instructional Community

Javier Horta, Clinical Laboratory & Nutritional Sciences




“Excellent faculty and teaching staff provide a strong support system that allows committed students to learn what they need to be successful.”
Javier Horta understands that today’s students are practically born with technology at their fingertips. When students come into the classroom, they’re able to quickly learn the ins and outs of new technology.  

“I am always looking for ways to expand the scope of how technology can be effectively implemented in the classroom to enhance learning, increase retention, and promote the success of my students,” says Horta, who teaches Physiological and Organic Chemistry in the College of Health Sciences. “Plus, the use of technology is fun!”

Horta has recently been using a new teaching method known as the “flipped” classroom

He records his lectures and posts them online for students to view as homework before coming to class. Then he uses class time for discussions, hands-on assignments and problem solving.

“This allows students to focus on the application of the concepts they are learning,” he says.

Horta, a licensed physician in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, earned an M.D. from the University of Miami in 2000. He then earned a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from MIT in 2006, and after teaching chemistry at Phillips Academy and Merrimack College, he came to UMass Lowell in 2010. 

He was attracted to the curriculum of the Department of Clinical Laboratory and Nutritional Sciences, where he could combine his background and training in both medicine and chemistry to teach students pursuing careers in the health professions.

He says: “UMass Lowell students work very hard to learn and succeed in their programs of study and beyond. The excellent faculty and teaching staff provide a strong support system that allows committed students to learn what they need to be successful.”

Horta continues to innovate and try new technologies that will help his students learn.

He says: “The use of clicker technology and online homework that’s instantly graded allows instructors to create frequent ‘check-points’ whereby students and instructors realize where the deficiencies lie and timely interventions can be implemented. In my opinion, technology is a ‘win-win’ situation for both students and instructors.”